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Coffee in San Francisco – my current favorites

10 June, 2009 (02:34) | food | By: Shannon Clark

San Francisco Coffee is among the best in the world.

I am a serious coffee drinker, I started drinking coffee seriously in high school, spent many hours in college in cafes throughout Hyde Park. However in College my focus was cheap, free refills, and a good working environment, I was less concerned that the coffee was really high quality.

But I was always passionate about local, independent cafes and while I lived in Chicago I grew to know and love many great small local cafes, spending most of my time in the ones that had great atmospheres and great coffee. Including among these was the amazingly high quality Inteligentsia Coffee which I was a customer of from their first cafe which opened up in Boystown and then later their locations downtown in the Loop. In the years since they have expanded to a cafe in LA and are among the growing Third Wave of cafes and local coffee roasters which have spread the serious coffee movement throughout the US and indeed around the globe.

I have now lived in the Bay Area for 3 1/2 years, in this time I have seen an explosion of great coffee roasters and cafes, led by a group of local coffee roasters and a growing and large coffee culture here in San Francisco. In this post I will write up some of my current favorite cafes in San Francisco, from time to time I will update this post as new places open or old places close.

As a frequent cafe customer I look for a few things in cafes I frequent on a regular basis.

  1. Great coffee. This should perhaps go without saying, but it makes a huge difference. There are some cafes whose space & location I love, but which I rarely frequent because the coffee does not match the space.
  2. Big tables. I have a theory of cafes. Small tables (think the tiny bistro tables of the traditional French cafe) make it hard to share a table with a stranger and make working on laptops awkward. My favorite cafes have always been the ones with large, oversized tables that promote sharing tables with strangers and allow for easy working with laptops.
  3. Free Wifi & Power. Though here I am will to make exceptions. Serious coffee trumps wifi – I just use my time in those cafes in different ways – for conversations, for time to catch up on my reading, for time to write offline. Later this year I expect I will have a portable data card (or tether my iPhone 3GS) so wifi will be less of an issue. Power too is easy to work around and it isn’t the worst thing to get up and move after 4+ hours in front of my laptop.
  4. Happy employees. The best cafes have happy, passionate employees. Employess who are treated well, who do their work with attention to detail and passion for quality.

There are many other factors I look for in great cafes. Good food is always welcome especially if locally sourced. And being open late fits my lifestyle well. Thankfully in San Francisco I have many options.

My not so short list of great cafes in San Francisco:

  • Blue Bottle – The coffee of choice for most of the top chefs in the Bay Area Blue Bottle is one the best coffee roasters I’ve ever tasted and their cafes are among the finest I know of anywhere in the world. It all started with their Kiosk in Hayes Valley at 315 Linden St and at the Ferry Building Farmer’s Markets. Now they have an amazing new space at 66 Mint St, a full cafe inside of the Ferry Building and a new location in the rooftop garden of the SF MOMA. At their full cafe on Mint in addition to great coffee prepared with serious attention to detail and more methods of preparation than any other cafe I’ve seen, they also have a small but great selection of food options which change during the course of the day. No wifi, but one of my favorite spots for business meetings, especially around conferences at the nearby Moscone Center.
  • Ritual Coffee Roasters – Ritual is rapidly overflowing their storefront location at 1026 Valencia St in the Mission where they removed couches and many tables to make room for their roaster and coffee storage in the back. They don’t have any power outlets, but still manage to almost always have full tables and a line for their fantastic coffee. With only a small selection of food (albiet tasty baked goods) Ritual is a destination for coffee drinking and a spot where many people sit and work. I’m the Foursquare mayor of Ritual on Valencia as a result of my many times a week visits. Ritual also has a smaller cafe inside of Flora Grub Gardens in Bayview at 1634 Jerrold Ave and a new cafe inside of the Oxbow Public Market at 610 First St in Napa. Ritual coffees are served by many great restaurants and cafes as well.
  • Four Barrel Coffee – Before they opened their well designed space at 375 Valencia St which features a large onsite coffee roaster and furniture built from reclaimed lumber, Four Barrel served coffee from the rear of their space via a kiosk open to the small alleyway. Founded by serious coffee people, Four Barrel is an example of a cafe that is all about the coffee, they have only a few baked goods and do not have wifi, yet are usually full until closing. They have a few wholesale customers here in SF and are a fantastic addition to the local coffee scene.
  • Epicenter Cafe – another new addition to San Francisco, Epicenter Cafe is located at 764 Harrison. They are not a coffee roaster but take coffee and food very seriously. Their beans are from Barefoot Coffee Roasters in Santa Clara (who also provide coffee to Google – a company that takes food and drink fairly seriously). The coffee here is fantastic, what I love about the cafe is the space, high quality food, lots of tables, power outlets and free wifi. It is quickly becoming one of my favorite spots in SOMA to work and have meetings.
  • Coffee Bar – Probably my favorite overall cafe in San Francisco. Coffee Bar is located at the corner of Mariposa & Florida in Potrero Hill. The coffee here is from Mr Espresso in Oakland (one of the owners is part of the family that runs Mr Espresso) and is prepared with great attention to detail both as espresso shots or on their reasonably priced Clover machines. But it is the space and food which is why I so love Coffee Bar. They have a great menu of food and drinks including wine and beer and a multileveled space which has been designed with great attention to detail. They have a long bar with underbar power outlets perfect for working alone as well as many oversized tables perfect for groups or for sharing with others. On Thursdays and Fridays they turn the kitchen over to Radio Africa Kitchen which offers some of the best food in San Francisco at extremely reasonable prices. I find the location, food, and ambiance combine to make Coffee Bar one of my favorite cafes and a highly productive space either for working on my laptop or for having great business meetings.
  • Philz - Philz coffee is a family run establishment here in San Francisco which has been expanding rapidly in the last few years, going from just a few locations when I first moved here to a growing number of locations throughout the Bay Area. Philz does not make espresso, instead they make coffee one cup at a time from their 20+ custom blends. Blends whose exact mixes they keep secret, but which are each unique and quite tasty. This is a $3+ single cup of coffee which is worth every penny. They have free wifi and a small selection of baked goods, but the main attraction is the amazing and very unique coffee. Coffee which is quite unlike any cup I’ve had anywhere else. Philz is a unique and welcome addition to the coffee culture in San Francisco and now the greater Bay Area.
  • Haus Coffee - a very new addition to San Francisco, opening just weeks ago, Haus Coffee is located at 3082 24th St. A beautiful, if minimalist space which soon will have a fantastic back patio, Haus serves coffee from Ritual Roasters. They have free wifi, large tables and very bright and airy space, with a fireplace for cool San Francisco evenings. One of my new favorite spots. note – I can’t find a URL for them, if you know it please leave a comment and I’ll update this post
  • Velo Rouge – Velo Rouge Cafe is a small cafe just blocks from Golden Gate Park at 798 Arguello Boulevard. They serve coffee from Ritual Roasters expertly prepared along with a great menu featuring local foods. Tasty food, great drinks and a fun space with a small be welcome set of tables outdoors. One of my favorite cafes in the Richmond district of San Francisco and a frequent stop on long weekend walks.
  • Hollow - by far the smallest cafe on my list, Hollow is a tiny space in the Inner Sunset at 1435 Irving St. In a space smaller than my first studio apartment, around 400 sq ft nestled between other retail shops, ¬†coffee from Ritual Roasters compliments the small but carefully selected products for sale. They have two tables inside with seating for only a few people, but the coffee is fantastic, the shopping excellent and owners friendly. A small gem of a cafe & design shop. Later this summer they will add a table outside. I spent a wonderful afternoon on a recent weekend drinking coffee and chatting with the owner.
  • Mojo Bicycle Cafe – A cafe in the front, a bike shop in the back, Mojo Bicycle Cafe at 639A Divisadero St is a cafe and bar, serving a small selection of food and coffee from De La Paz & Ritual Roasters. Great coffee, good drink selection and you can buy a bike or get your bike repaired while you hang out. A small but fun space with a devoted customer base.
  • The Cafe at Cafe Du Nord – Another fairly new addition to San Francisco, the Cafe at Cafe Du Nord is a small cafe which opened up earlier this year next door to Cafe Du Nord nightclub & the Swedish American hall event space. Located at 2168 Market St the cafe features coffee from Ritual Roasters and very tasty food. The sandwiches are particularly good and go well with the great coffee. The free wifi is nice, though the space is a bit small and tables slightly crowded together, I have worked here but it isn’t ideal for long working sessions.
  • Cafe Du Soleil – A French cafe at 200 Filmore, just a block off of Haight St, has good but not fantastic coffee which is more than made up for having great food and a very French atmosphere. This is an adult cafe where you can enjoy great food, wine and coffee along with the free wifi and large communal table. The baked goods are exceptional and the ambiance makes this one of my favorite places to work in San Francisco. The coffee is good, but not as serious as at most of the other places on this list.
  • Samovar Tea Lounge – And to end this list a place that does not serve coffee at all. Samovar Tea Lounge has three locations in San Francisco (297 Page Street at Laguna, Yerba Buena Gardens at 730 Howard St above the Moscone Center, and 498 Sanchez St in the Castro). Samovar is a place for serious tea and great food. I love coffee but I also am a serious fan of Tea, Samovar has the best tea I have found in San Francisco, served with patience and food that compliments the teas exceptionally well. The Yerba Buena Gardens location is another of my favorite spots for downtown business meetings but also for first dates. It transitions well from a relaxed environment for long conversations and relaxation to a great place for a first date.

There are many other great cafes in San Francisco, cafes with loyal fans, friendly staff, tasty food and beverages but these are the places I return to again and again, the spots I take out of town guests to, the places I plan my day around visiting.

What are your favorites? What are places I should also try?

A review of Harrison Owen’s Open Space Technology 3rd Edition

17 September, 2008 (03:52) | branding | By: Shannon Clark

I first encountered Open Space as a meeting format in the mid-1990′s in Chicago. I was a member of the Company of Friends, a group of readers of the magazine Fast Company which gathered together on a monthly basis. In Chicago the monthly meetings were held as Open Space meetings.

Since that time I have facilitated and opened many Open Space meetings and helped with seemingly countless other Open Space events or events held in the spirit of Open Space, if not always in the most formal of manners.

I highly recommend that everyone interested in Open Space visit Harrison Owen’s site Open Space World (.com) and the sister site Open Space World (.org) , a site managed in part by my good friend Michael Herman. And of course, I’ll cut to the chase in this review and also suggest that you buy the book (hint the image above is a link to Amazon and yes, I’ll get a very small affiliate fee if you click that link and buy it)

So what is Open Space and how does it apply to Slow Brands?

The short answer is that Open Space is a methodology for holding meetings which is incrediably powerful, seemingly simple, and yet also somewhat counterintuative. The meetings start without any formal agenda, instead the participants set the agenda, usually there are no speakers and little formal structure yet a lot can and does happen.

Harrison Owen’s book goes into great detail about all aspects of opening and holding an Open Space, his focus is generally on a fairly formal process which starts from an assumption that the space is opened by an inviation sent to a group of people who share a common and usually pressing interest.

Here in Silicon Valley, however, a hybrid type of meeting started a few years ago and has spread rapidly all over the world. These BarCamps while structurely often very similar to Open Space’s usually involve a large group of people with some shared interested, but usually from many different organizations and often brought together without a large specific or pressing purpose. As a result BarCamps tend to be held in a somewhat less formal manner than an Open Space as Harrison Owen describes them.

In my own practice I also generally modifty the formal aspects of Open Space in a few key areas.

But getting back to Slow Brands, what lessons can be learned from Open Space?

A key part of Open Space is the Four Principles and One Law.

The Four Principles

Whoever comes is the right people

Whatever happens is the only thing that could have

Whenver it starts is the right time

When it’s over it’s over

The One Law

The Law of Two Feet

All that may sound a bit cryptic, even contradictory for a method of holding a meeting (how do you schedule such a meeting if discussions will take however long they have to take and that’s defined as being just fine?)

But underlying all of the principles and the law is a respect for others and a appreciation of quality over quantity or formal process. A lesson all brands, but especially smart, Slow Brands, would be wise to learn and ponder.

How can you think about your brand, your corporate identity and messaging, not just as something formal and sent down from above (i.e from the company to customers) but as part of an ongoing process?

If you get the chance to participate in an Open Space I encourage you to do so, if you find yourself planning a meeting, especially a meeting around a pressing and important topic and find that you are bogged down in agendas, schduling, and formal structure, consider the seemingly slower (but actually often faster) option of an Open Space.

And yes, though it is not my primary¬† service, I am occasionally available as a facilitator for Open Spaces (or can if I’m not available suggest fantastic facilitators).